G.I. Surplus of Wayne
Home
Store Hours
How to Order
HUNTERS SALE
New Arrivals
Basic stock items
Bags, Rucks, Backpacks
Beds, Bunks, & Cots
Big Size Dept.
Boots
Childrens
Coats, Jackets, Parkas
Costume Central
Flight Suits
Gift Sets
Hats & Helmets
Leather Jackets
Parachutes
Self Defense
Service Flags
Tee Shirts
Tents & Tarps
Uniforms
Vietman Era Gear
Women's Clothing
Memorial Services
Survival Series
Home Town Heros
Discount
Location
Contact Us

SERVICE FLAGS


Service Flags / "Over Sea's Flag"

Available: 1, 2 or 3 stars

Blue & Gold stars

$10.00

 



WINDOW DECALS

 Available with 1, 2 or 3 stars 

3" X 5"   

Price $4.00


The Service flag is an official banner authorized by the Department of Defense for display by families who have members serving in the Armed Forces during any period of war or hostilities the United States may be engaged in for the duration of such hostilities.

The Service flag, also called the Blue Star Flag, was designed and patented by WWI Army Captain Robert L. Queissner of the 5th Ohio Infantry who had two sons serving on the front line. The flag quickly became the unofficial symbol of a child in service. President Wilson became part of this history when in 1918 he approved a suggestion made by the Women's Committee of the Council of National Defenses that mothers who had lost a child serving in the war wear a gold gilt star on the traditional black mourning arm band. This led to the tradition of covering the blue star with a gold star on the Service flag to indicate that the service member has died.

The Department of Defense specifies that family members authorized to display the flag include the wife, husband, mother, father, stepmother or father, parent through adoption, foster parents who stand or stood loco parentis, children, stepchildren, children through adoption, brothers, sisters and half brothers or sisters of a member of the Armed Forces of the United States. The flag should be displayed in a window of the residence of persons authorized.

The Service flag may also be displayed by an organization to honor the members of that organization serving during a period of war or hostilities.

The Service Flag is an indoor flag and should be flown facing out from the front window of the home or organization.

If the U.S. flag is also displayed with the Service flag, the U.S. flag should be of equal or greater proportions and should take the place of honor above the Service flag.

Each blue star on the flag represents a service member in active duty. A gold star is displayed if a service member is killed in action or dies in service. If several stars are displayed by one family the gold star takes the honor of being placed at the top. The gold star should be slightly smaller than the blue star to create a blue border surrounding the gold star.